Prayer, Love, and Human Nature: Analytic Theology for Theological Formation

Prayer, Love, and Human Nature: Analytic Theology for Theological Formation is a multi-million dollar initiative funded by the John Templeton Foundation at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. We are a team of theologians working on deepening and thickening out Analytic Theology, as well as applying it to the practice of Christian churches.

EVENTS

LEARN MORE

THE GRANT

LEARN MORE

THEOLOGY FORMATION

LEARN MORE

RESOURCES

LEARN MORE

ABOUT

LEARN MORE

CONTACT US

MESSAGE US

BLOG

Trent Dougherty on Phenomenology of Evidence in Science and Theology

What is the relationship between theology and evidence? On January 24, the Analytic Theology team welcomed Dr. Trent Dougherty, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Baylor University, along to help us answer this question.

Meghan Sullivan, “Faith, Practical Reason, and Risk”

The University of Notre Dame philosopher Meghan Sullivan raised a number of issues pertaining to creedal beliefs in her talk at Fuller Seminary on January 17, 2018. 

Crossing Hudson’s Bridge

Hud Hudson, professor of philosophy at Western Washington University, delivered the second of Fuller’s 2018 Analytic Theology lectures. Besides having a cool name, and a voice that our team deemed radio-ready, Hudson’s paper evinces a truly collegial spirit.  In his three-part paper, “A Metaphysical Bridge,” he suggests that analytic philosophy can play the role of a bridge (i.e., interface) between science and religion in dialogue.

Cognitive Science, Incarnation, and the Fullness of Time

Now, if Christians believe that it is important that the events of the gospel actually happened at these times and these places, we might wonder: does it matter to Christians that these events happened at the particular times and places that they in fact did? In other words, could the events of the gospel have happened in some other time and place? More specifically, given the actual course of history, could the incarnation have happened in some other time and place? Justin Barrett, Professor of Psychology and one of the founders of the field of cognitive science of religion, set out to answer this question.

SEE ALL