Prayer, Love, and Human Nature: Analytic Theology for Theological Formation

Prayer, Love, and Human Nature: Analytic Theology for Theological Formation is a multi-million dollar initiative funded by the John Templeton Foundation at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. We are a team of theologians working on deepening and thickening out Analytic Theology, as well as applying it to the practice of Christian churches.

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The human as micro-cosmos

We have come to the end! The last seminar of the year and of the AT project at Fuller. For those of you who have been with us from the beginning, this is something like 60 seminars with speakers from around the country and the globe.

On “Experimental Theology”

As the penultimate seminar speaker of the entire Analytic Theology Project, we were delighted to welcome Fuller’s own Dr. Kutter Callaway. In his talk, “Experimental Theology: Theological Anthropology in Conversation with the Sciences,” Callaway explored directly the “conversational” aspect of our research project, viz., what we mean by deploying this term, how it describes the normal use/misuse of varying disciplines in an interdisciplinary project, and what sort of method might better be used to go beyond mere conversation.

Dr. Jesse Couenhoven: Is Original Sin empirically verifiable?

Very much of Christian teaching is not empirically verifiable — for instance, the doctrines of Trinity, Incarnation, and Atonement certainly are not — but for some time the claim has been made that at least one core doctrine is. Various figures in recent Christian history have made the affirmation that Christian teaching about Original Sin is empirically verifiable, though they have not made great efforts to try to prove their point. This is where Dr. Jesse Couenhoven’s paper comes in.

What hath CSR to do with Jerusalem?

According to Cognitive Science of Religion (CSR) we now have empirical support that humans are naturally inclined to interpret their environment religiously. What should we do with this discovery?  In other words, what is Cognitive Science of Religion and how should it inform theological method? These questions provided the outline for Dr. Myron Penner’s recent lecture to the Analytic Theology group at Fuller Seminary.

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